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Tyson Fury: I wasn’t at my best

World heavyweight boxing champion Wladimir Klitschko (left) of Ukraine defends against Britain’s Tyson Fury during their WBA, IBF, WBO and IBO title bout in Duesseldorf, western Germany, on Saturday. Fury dethroned Klitschko in a 12 round decision to become new world heavyweight champion.

World heavyweight boxing champion Wladimir Klitschko (left) of Ukraine defends against Britain’s Tyson Fury during their WBA, IBF, WBO and IBO title bout in Duesseldorf, western Germany, on Saturday. Fury dethroned Klitschko in a 12 round decision to become new world heavyweight champion.

TYSON Fury claims the world only got to see around “65 per cent” of his ability as he dethroned former heavyweight champion Wladimir Klitschko in Germany.

The 27-year-old scored a unanimous points decision over the Ukrainian, who had been undefeated in over a decade, and says he could have gone to 15 rounds with ease.

Fury, who captured the WBA Super, WBO and IBF titles in Dusseldorf, even went as far as telling Sky Sports News HQ he was unhappy with his performance.

Asked yesterday morning if his multiple-title win had sunk in yet, Fury said: “Yes, very much so but I don’t feel any different than I did yesterday.

“I never got to bed till ten to four [this morning] but I do feel fresh. I feel good, not too sore, a little bit around the eyes and pain inside of my head but not too bad, to be honest, after a 12-round fight with the so-called best fighter on the planet.

“For me that was a bad performance, although it was good enough to win the heavyweight championship of the world and beat a man who had not been beaten in 10,11 years – it wasn’t as good as I can do and I have got plenty of people to back that up.

“That was about 60-65 per cent of my arsenal last night. I can go up another level as well so I can’t wait to get on to the next performance to do even better.”

Klitschko has already said he wants to exercise the option of a rematch in the original fight contract, but Fury says time will tell if that happens and claims he knew he could get away with taunting the Ukrainian in the ring.

He said: “I think he will take the rematch but it is all right when the blood is going and the adrenaline is pumping, but when he gets home and has a couple of weeks to think about it, he knows that was a one-sided fight last night.

“There were rounds in there I was playing with him, I had my hands behind my back, hands in the air and taunting him the whole way through. I was playing games in there. It was our plan to enjoy the fight from the first bell until as long as it lasted.

“Next time when we do have the rematch, I think it is going to be a much easier fight.”

Fury beliefs teaming up with his trainer and uncle Peter in January 2012 saved his boxing career as he was close to retiring.

“When I got with Peter in early 2012, I was going to stop boxing back then,” he said. “I was fat, out of shape, 24 stone, I didn’t think I was going to go anywhere because I wasn’t taking it seriously.

“I was just boxing to try and get a quick few quid in. I thought if I won, I won, if I lost, I lost. I didn’t really care at that point because I knew I wasn’t doing the right training, I knew I wasn’t doing the right things.

“I was staying out late drinking and going out clubbing and all that sort of stuff. And I just thought to myself I’m going to give it one last go.

“Peter and I have stuck it through thick and thin because don’t think it hasn’t been hard with all the cancellations, the fights being put off, back on and messed around and being hard to match.

“Since January 2012 we’ve had about three weeks’ break. We just had camp after camp after camp and as you can see it has paid dividends because I wasn’t tired last night after doing 12 rounds – I probably could have gone the distance if it was a 15-rounder.



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