Boxing  

Rumble on the Atlantic, a fight night of two halves

Boxing 12On a cool December evening, after months of planning, weeks of training, hours of gal Ming up and minutes away from the first rung of the judges’ bell, we witnessed, first-hand, the first of its kind; a white collar boxing event in Nigeria, The Rumble on the Atlantic.

Friends and family, guests and corporate sponsors all graced the spectacular Eko Atlantic boulevard for the nation’s first white collar boxing event and what would also end up being a bout with Mother Nature.

The stage was set for 12 fighters, who had given up time from their busy schedules and livelihoods to dedicate five weeks into getting in shape and fit for the maiden edition of the Rumble on the Atlantic.

Lights, camera, action… The first three fights were a testament to the uniqueness of boxing and the meticulous nature in which EliteBox, the home of boxing, had prepared the fighters and geared the crowd for a night worth a slot in our memory banks.

As the crowd grew more involved, so was Mother Nature, in brewing up a storm and spitting down pellets of rain… She came throwing hooks and jabs of thunder and lighting, putting a long pause to the show.

Oh no! Not this time, not this round, with defiance like a wounded champion, the Rumble on the Atlantic clawed back. The ring quickly mopped up, stripped bare of the frills of glitz and glam.

Guests beaming headlights on and standing around the ring, chanting and encouraging, the Rumble on the Atlantic put on the last three of the billed fights, with enough time to watch four teenage boxers show what the future of boxing had in store.

In the words of Rehia Giwa-Osagie, founder of Elitebox, “we thoroughly enjoyed a tale of two halves of boxing, which showed all sides of the sport; the glitz and glam as well as the grit and doggedness displayed by fighters and enduring spectators alike through the course of the evening.”

In this article:
BoxingRehia Giwa-Osagie


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