Oxfam sets out seven steps to Paris climate change deal

By Tunde Alao   |   29 November 2015   |   11:23 pm  
A photo taken on November 17, 2015 in Paris shows the Eiffel Tower illuminated with the French national colors in tribute to the victims of the November 13, 2015 Paris terror attacks. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAY        (Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)

A photo taken on November 17, 2015 in Paris shows the Eiffel Tower illuminated with the French national colors in tribute to the victims of the November 13, 2015 Paris terror attacks. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAY (Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)

A grim picture painted is that even if all of today’s public adaptation finance were to be divided among the 1.5 billion small-holder farmers in developing countries, they would get the equivalent of just three dollars a year to protect themselves from floods, severe droughts and other climate extremes – the cost of a cup of coffee in many rich countries

Delays in cutting emissions is likely to cost developing countries hundreds of billions of dollars or more, besides, developing countries’ economies face being crushed under the double burden of climate change adaptation that may costs of almost $800 billion and economic losses every year by 2050, if pledges to cut emissions are not improved, Oxfam warned.

In a new report released for COP21: Game-changers in the Paris climate deal, Oxfam sets out seven steps to a Paris deal that will better protect poor people from climate change, but advises Nigerian government to implement the National Agricultural Resilience Framework to reduce food and nutrition vulnerability and enhance resilience for poor farmers, especially women in the country.

The organization reveals that in a world warming to three degrees, developing countries are set to face an additional $270 billion more a year in adaptation costs by 2050, taking the total to $790 billion. That means more than 50 per cent could be needed for developing countries to protect themselves from climate change than in a two degree scenario, which leaders meeting at the UN climate talks in Paris are aiming for.

Developing countries also face losing $1.7 trillion annually to their economies by the middle of the century if global average temperatures rise by three degrees. This is $600 billion more than if warming was contained to two degrees – four times more than rich countries gave in development aid last year.

“We are seeing growing momentum for a climate deal but what is on the table so far is not enough. Our report today shows the scale of the challenge facing the world’s poorest people as a result of climate change – which they have done very little to cause.

“World leaders need to step up. We need further cuts to emissions and more climate funding so vulnerable communities – who are already facing unpredictable floods, droughts and hunger – can adapt to survive. The human cost of climate change must be central to discussions in Paris so we get a better climate deal for poor people.” Said Oxfam’s Executive Director, Winnie Byanyima.

It stated further that, even if all of today’s public adaptation finance were to be divided among the 1.5 billion small-holder farmers in developing countries, they would get the equivalent of just three dollars a year to protect themselves from floods, severe droughts and other climate extremes – the cost of a cup of coffee in many rich countries.

“The pledges by more than 150 countries to cut emissions, known as INDCs (Intended Nationally Determined Contributions) are expected to be the cornerstone of a Paris deal. But even if these targets are met, the world is likely to experience devastating warming of around three degrees. This could come despite the UN’s goal of two degrees, let alone the 1.5 degrees that more than 100 developing countries and Oxfam is calling for.

However, Head of Programmes, Oxfam in Nigeria, Constant Tchona, assured that the organisation would continue to engage Nigerian government and businesses to provide secure access to land for smallholder farmers and especially for women – who often do most of the work on the land, but face the biggest battle to call it their own.



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