Christmas and the challenges of nation building

christmas

Interreligious dialogue is very important but not enough. We must also promote intra-religious harmony. Intra-religious dialogue demands that we acknowledge pluralism and differences even within our faiths. The Christian community must accept the challenge of working towards ever-greater unity, as much as we can, rather than acquiescing, or even encouraging and maybe celebrating our present state of scandalous dividedness. We ask God to show us the way to sort out the problems that have been bedeviling the Christian Association of Nigeria, (CAN) in the past few years.

Within the Islamic community, I beg to be allowed to strongly encourage that differences should also be recognised and taken on board, within the greater Islamic community. The recent crisis with the Shiite group is a cause for concern, not only for Muslims but also for the entire nation. If there are other Muslim groups, they too must have a right to free expression and an opportunity for them to play their own role for the building up of our nation. Every religious group must be seen as seeking ways to serve God and through God serving our neighbour, within the ambit of the law of the land. It is the duty of the state to protect all genuine religions, and be very slow to ban any, no matter how inconvenient.

Our country is in serious political, economic and social difficulties. We seem to have remained largely in the mood of political polarisation typical of election campaign period. After the election, which took place almost two years ago, campaigns are now over and we should by now be fully in governance mode. All hands must be on deck to face the many great challenges that are weighing heavily on our nation. We must forever ban the attitude of “winner take all,” which also tends to provoke in the losers the counter mood of “pulling them down.” Our geographical, religious and ethnic identities, all crisscross. This in itself is the gift of God for us to be able to bring down walls of division. The scandalous social disparity between the rich and the poor in our country has led to an intolerable yawning gap crying to be filled. Poverty and unemployment have been growing, leading to despair and frustration in many quarters, especially among the youth. Dishonesty and corruption have hardly visibly reduced. Our overwhelming problems require our common action from the different agents and stakeholders in the society.

At this Christmas, we must accept the message of peace, peace at all costs, including by the route of love, of humility and simplicity. It is of course, the duty of government to make and enforce laws. But the endemic corruption in our land may be calling for some amount of negotiation towards repentance, refunds and possible amnesty. The limits of the route of tribunals are getting more and more obvious. The war against corruption must be waged with all possible weapons. It is the duty of the government to secure the land against armed insurrection. We congratulate our government for major progress made in dealing with Boko Haram crisis in the North East. Mr. President has reason to boast that Boko Haram, from the military point of view has been “technically defeated.” But it is not yet all over.

We pray that soon the millions of our countrymen, women and children still living in camps as Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) will be able to return home, a home that will be secure and ready to receive them. At the same time, however, more should be done to give them a viable option of settling elsewhere in the country. For example, there are many IDP camps all around Abuja. Those who have been languishing in these camps for more than two years have every right to ask for resettlement within the Federal Capital Territory. It is affront to human dignity to leave people to rot away in such camps. After all, almost all of us here have come to settle here from different parts of the nation.

In the meantime, however, while we thank God that the Boko Haram in the North East has been “technically defeated”, another almost equally serious security challenge has been building up all over the nation. I am referring to the bands of heavily armed bandits who have gone on rampage for the last few years. They are often called “Fulani Herdsmen.”Whoever they are and wherever they are coming from, they have now constituted themselves into a major national security menace, which requires an effective action from our armed forces. They have been destroying farmlands, attacking villages and settlements, occupying captured ancestral lands and they have killed thousands of Nigerians. No wonder that my friend and brother, the Sultan of Sokoto, Mohammed Sa’ad Abubakar has been quoted to have compared them to terrorists. This must stop. The authorities must take effective action, so as to defuse the rising tide of resentment and hatred in many communities against the Fulani herdsmen and all who are considered related to them.

Fellow Nigerians, we all come from families. In our families, which are the most important social unit, we accept one another, our parents as well as our siblings, as gifts of God. We have not chosen them. God has given them to us. The same family attitude ought to be extended to our national belonging. Despite all debates about whether or not it was a mistake to have put us together in one country in 1914, the fact is that we are already together. To separate ourselves now would be indeed a herculean task. It would be wiser, and far less cumbersome and problematic to put all our efforts together to accepting one another as God’s gift, in the same nation given to us by God. We must do our best to live in peace and harmony, not only despite our differences but also because of our common values and common challenges. Let me conclude with the wise words from a great politician, diplomat and intellectual of our neighbouring nation of Benin Republic, Professor Albert Tevoedjre. He says: “Faced with the impossibility of placing a soldier behind each citizen to guarantee his or her safety, the only credible sustainable option is to strengthen all the mechanisms that enable us to live together, despite all our differences.”

• John Cardinal Onaiyekan is the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Abuja. He delivered this Christmas Message at the 2016 National Christmas Carols in Abuja.



1 Comment
  • ada-ifeanyi okorie

    Well said Archbishop Onaiyekan ,our leaders must rise up to their responsibility, no tribe,ethnic,religious or regional group
    should be given or treated prefferically above another. All group must be accorded equal respect for peace to reign.similarly, in families where parents show preference to any particular child over others,seed of distrust and bitterness is planted and its usually very difficult to uproot.Our leaders own us that responsibility to be transparent and sincere in all they do at all times.God bless NIGERIA and merry Christmas.

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