Illicit drugs use in pregnancy unsafe, even in small amount — Expert

Alcohol in pregnancy

Alcohol in pregnancy

Mr Yabo Makoshi, the Head of Department of Pharmacy, National Hospital, Abuja, has advised pregnant women against the use of illicit drugs even in small amount.

Makoshi gave the advice in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja on Monday.

He said that the use of hard drugs by pregnant women could affect both the mother and the unborn child at every stage of pregnancy and after birth.

According to him, all illegal drugs that pass through the placenta at early stage of pregnancy can have some effect on the development of the foetus.

He explained that the consumption of such drugs could also reduce the amount of oxygen supplied to the growing foetus, among other complications.

He added that “the effect of hard drugs may lead to the placenta moving away from the side of the uterus, which could lead to severe bleeding.

“It can also be life-threatening for both the mother and the baby.’’

The head of department said that taking drugs such as cannabis, also called marijuana during pregnancy could make the baby unsettled after birth.

“In the long run, it could also cause behavior and learning problems for the baby as he or she grows older.’’

Makoshi said such babies may experience withdrawal symptoms, adding that they may stay longer in hospital for further examinations.

He noted that smoking could also expose the unborn child to low birth weight and other complications.

After delivery, he said, the nursing mother could also experience various challenges, which include depression and difficulty in coping with the needs of the infant.

He said that such individual needed the support of family members and friends.

He, therefore, advised addictive mothers to seek medical help from health professionals with such expertise as sudden withdrawal could be harmful.

1 Comment
  • amador kester

    Such hard drugs could be perinatally teratogenic in toxicity and precipitate deformities in unborn children. Pharmacists in nigeria do not offer drug information desks or centres in hospitals. Neither do doctors and their union