OPS tasks govt on revenue losses from parlous infrastructure

By Femi Adekoya   |   10 November 2015   |   11:01 pm  

Dauda Ilo Street, Ejigbo. 					                  PHOTO: OSENI YUSUF

Dauda Ilo Street, Ejigbo. PHOTO: OSENI YUSUF

MEMBERS of the Organised Private Sector (OPS) have raised concerns on the negative implications of prolonged traffic congestion in the various parts of Lagos on the economic profile of the state.

Specifically, the stakeholders expressed worries on the staggering revenue losses recorded by firms in the last few weeks due to the loss of productive man-hours resulting from massive traffic jam caused by bad roads, floods and poor traffic management.

Members of the OPS including the Nigerian Association of Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture (NACCIMA) and Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) equally cited the deplorable state of roads, especially those leading to the Lagos ports, Apapa and Tincan Island ports.

According to the chambers, poor state of the roads has had multifarious effects on the private sector, economy and the citizens, as the ports account for over 60 per cent of cargo into the country and an estimated 70 per cent of Customs’ revenue.

NACCIMA stated that after due consultation with stakeholders in the Transportation/Maritime sector of the economy, including officials of Lagos State Government, there is a need to sustain constructive discussion to find a lasting solution and put an end to the re-current gridlock in Lagos.

National President, NACCIMA, Edem Bassey, while encouraging all citizens to abide by the law, urged the Lagos State Government to consider adopting other strategies in the application of the law pending the time when all basic infrastructures would be put in place to ease the challenges currently being faced by road users.

Similarly, LCCI President, Remi Bello said: “The bad roads have led to congestion at the ports, high cost of transportation for evacuating cargo because of the prolonged engagement of the trucks by importers arising from the delays, serious traffic congestion along the roads leading to the ports, which often spills over into the Lagos Metropolis causing severe traffic jam.”



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