Health  

OAM foundation donates glasses to aid vision in people with albinism

Albinism is the inability of the skin cells to produce enough melanin pigment in the skin, eye and hair, thereby making persons with albinism vulnerable to the harmful effect of the ultra-violet rays (UVR) from the sun.

To aid proper vision in Albinism, the Onome Akinlolu Majaro (OAM) foundation has given out free glasses and frames to people living with albinism.

Albinism is the inability of the skin cells to produce enough melanin pigment in the skin, eye and hair, thereby making persons with albinism vulnerable to the harmful effect of the ultra-violet rays (UVR) from the sun.

Speaking during the donation at the Guinness Eye Centre, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), the Director OAM foundation, Mrs. Rita Paul Okagbare cautioned that albinism should not be regarded as a disability, but a genetic disorder of colouration, adding that people with albinism have faced various types of inhuman treatments and discrimination from jobs, education and social activities as well as targeted for rituals in some environment.

She added that it was against the backdrop, that the foundation was formed and embarked on measures to promote awareness campaign, empower albinos and has given out these free glasses and frames to assist their vision from sun blocks.

Also speaking, the Consultant Ophthalmologist and Head of Department of Ophthalmology, LUTH, Prof. Adeola Onakoya said, it was important people living with albinism use glasses to aid their vision as well as sun shades to prevent sun rays from damaging their eyes.

She said their low visions are due to lack of melanin pigment in the nerves of their eyes. “Like some of them, their eyes are always dancing because they can’t just focus, but with the help of glasses and some visual aids, their vision can be improved on for them to live a better life.”

Onakoya added that due to their poor vision, they are limited in their career choice, especially those involving depth and exposure to the sun.

Meanwhile, Consultant Dermatologist and Head, Dermatology Unit, LUTH, Dr. Olusola Ayanlowo stressed the need for parents to protect the skin of their albino children from the effect of the sun, which can cause severe damage to their skin and eyes, adding that they should wear clothing that shields their body as well as brim hats and umbrellas.

She, however, added that albinos should visit the hospitals once or twice a year for screening and check ups on their skin to prevent cancer or any form of danger to their skin.



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