Low-cost chain-schools to expand access to improved quality learning, says Tooley

Tooley

Tooley

The newly launched Headhigh International Schools, a chain of low-cost private schools in Lagos, will in the short and long run expand access to quality education for under-privileged children, so says international patron of Association for Formidable Educational Development (AFED), Prof. James Tooley.

Addressing newsmen in Lagos on the modus operandi of the schools, five of which will take-off this month as a pilot project, Tooley said that the new schools have the potential to transform low-cost private education in the country, as well as widen access to quality education for children from low-income families.

Of the five schools in the pilot project, Tooley said that two are located in Ikorodu; one at Ajangbadi; one at Ikotun and one at Victoria Island, adding that the schools will use the same students’ uniform, operate with the same curriculum, motto, rules and regulations.

He said, “There is crisis in education in Nigeria, the youth population is expanding rapidly, but public education is neither coping with demand, nor providing educational quality that will lead to productive human capital development. All this means we are sitting on a time bomb, risking unemployed youths becoming engaged in violent acts that will further stall the economic growth.

“The good news is that a revolution is taking place in education in the developing world, with Nigeria and Lagos in particular at the forefront. In Lagos State alone, there are estimated 18,000 private schools, the majority of which are likely to be serving the socio-economically disadvantaged. In other states, there are also considerable numbers. AFED has been created to coordinate and assist the activities of these low-cost schools in Nigeria. And so, Head High International chain-schools would afford children from low-income homes quality education of international standard, with low fees across Lagos and beyond.”

He added that, “The head office team would prepare lesson plans for teachers centrally and send to the teachers’ smart phones. The lead teachers would monitor the activities of other teachers in each school, and coastal managers to monitor a group of five schools. Pupils will also be provided with self-learning and peer-learning devices.’’

Meanwhile, National Patron of AFED, Prof. Pat Utomi, has lauded the new project, adding that “AFED and the collaborating partners will provide the opportunity for social impact investment, through which good returns can come, and social transformation also come from investing. This offer will provide a remarkable opportunity to kill two birds with one stone.”

In this article:
AFEDJames TooleyPat Utomi


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