ILO to tackle future of work, others at annual confab

Joseph Sepp Blatter

Joseph Sepp Blatter

THE International Labour Conference (ILO) has slated future of work, the informal economy and other key issues for discussion at its annual International Labour Conference which kicked off in Geneva, Switzerland yesterday (Monday).

In a related development, the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) has flayed the Federation of International Football Association (FIFA) for the continued abuse of workers’ rights working on the stadia scheduled to host the 2022 World Cup slated for Qatar.

The two weeks conference is expected to draw participants from worker, employer and government delegates from the ILO’s 185 member States will also tackle other wide range of issues, including the transition from the informal to the formal economy, small and medium-sized enterprises and decent and productive employment creation, social protection (labour protection), the application of international labour standards, and programme and budget proposals for 2016/2017.

In his opening address to the Conference on 1 June, ILO Director-General, Guy Ryder will refer to this conference report on the ILO’s future of work centenary initiative.

On Thursday 11 June, a World of Work Summit will address climate change and the world of work. A panel discussion is scheduled for World Day against Child Labour on Friday 12 June. On both days a number of high-level guests, including the President of Ghana John Dramani Mahama, the President of Panama Juan Carlos Varela and the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate

Kailash Satyarthi, as well representatives of the social partners, will address the Conference.

The ITUC has described FIFA President Joseph Blatter’s position on happenings in Qatar as untenable, with the indictment by US authorities of nine FIFA officials and five company executives on corruption charges, and the launch of a criminal investigation by the Swiss Attorney-General’s Office.

ITUC General Secretary, Sharan Burrow, said: “After 17 years at the head of FIFA, during which the stink of corruption around FIFA grew stronger, Mr Blatter should step down forthwith, and the Swiss authorities should now place FIFA under judicial supervision.

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