Petlife:Prevent Your Pet From Being Stolen

petSO, how do you prevent your pet from being stolen? – Establish your ownership This is actually a natural, but intricate thing. It is a process that confirms your ownership of the pet. Let him know who the boss is. How can you achieve this? Your constant presence and deliberate participation in all activities that concern the pet is the key.

Make sure you specially allot time to spend with the pet daily. Involve yourself in routines, like feeding, playing and exercising with the pet. Generally bond with him to create an atmosphere of true and total friendship.

While doing this, don’t allow the pet to have his way. Your word should be law and whatever you want should obtain. The “you” here is actually you and members of your immediate family- your wife and children and any trusted relative who may be living with you. The pet should equally trust them and take things only from them.

Outside the niche, the pet should be taught to ignore orders from “strangers,” abhor following them and undue socialisation discouraged. – Limit undue exhibition When you encourage your pet to meet your visitors or people who are not living with you, you may be unknowingly selling your soul to robbers.

I have often been surprised at owners who tell their visitors to come in, that Daisy is not fierce and often shout the dog off to allow your friends in.

Even if you have a mugu (permit that language) of a dog, please protect the integrity of that pet by quietly keeping him away to allow your friends access, not by aggressively sending him away and shattering his dignity. And in case you have a lovely pet that you wish to show people, your territory should not be the runway.

Do that outside your house and never allow unnecessary familiarisation of the pet to other people. “Oh, you can play with him” should have its limits.

Keep the beauty of your pooch and his exploits to yourself. Sink with it with your family and savour its taste. After all, it belongs to you and no one else. – Allow and nurture his territorial instincts Most pets, especially dogs, are territorial.

They love to dominate and protect their immediate environment. Allow this natural instinct a place in your heart. Let your compound be his country; let him know the provinces and precincts, let him run the government.

You may not achieve this when you lock him away in one dingy kennel, where he begins to sense that he is just a governor of a part of that country.

I have a lot of examples of this kind of behaviour when the dog thinks his kennel is the only territory he has to protect. Take him on drives; take him on walks. Let him mark your neighbourhood; let him know your surroundings; let him master his territory.

He will never get lost, at least not in that environment, unless he is driven very far. – Take the trouble; do it yourself There are certain things you should do yourself, such as walking and exercising with your pet.

You may even derive some health benefits from these activities. But above all, it presents the opportunity for the dog to know you and bond only with you and nobody else.

It may not be out of the way to allow somebody else to walk your dog, but these are perilous times. Nobody can be trusted. Gauge the situation and make your choices.

However, it may be very apt to follow my suggestion, so that nobody will take the advantage of helping you to steal your dog. – No feeding by strangers Allow only members of your immediate family or a trusted aide to feed your pets.

The pets should be expressly taught not to take food or treats from nobody else. It is important to keep to this rule to prevent potential thieves from enticing your pet with food or treat.   – Be security conscious Always be at alert with your security.

Do not expose your compound unnecessarily, especially when your dog is not leashed or chained, that is, when he has not been fully trained to take care of his territory. If he has, he would not even venture outside even if the gates are fully opened.

But be cautious. – Socialisation, socialisation and socialisation I will quietly warn that in the process of endearing the dog to only you and members of your immediate family, you should not forget to socialise him with other dogs and people. Your pet must be animal and people friendly, but set your limits.

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