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Lafarge power plant and Ogun’s industrial milieu

By Wole Elegbede, Imeko, Ogun State.   |   07 September 2015   |   10:29 pm  

Lafarge WAPCOSIR: Lafarge Africa, the cement manufacturers based in Ewekoro, Ogun State, fervently announced in July 2015 that its power plant with a capacity to generate 220mw of electricity will be commissioned in October, this year.

I expect this development to be cheering news to most Nigerians not only because it can facilitate improved supply of power to their homes, it also has the capacity to occasion gainful employment and contribute to the prosperity of the nation.

I am excited because the Nigerian media has given this project the deserved attention because it is a developmental project. Not only was the news of the October commissioning gleefully reported, the media also paid stupendous attention to the courtesy visit by the management of the company to the governor of Ogun State, Ibikunle Amosun on Monday, July 27, 2015 and the subsequent call on the Vice-President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo by the management of the same company the following week.

The two visits might not be unconnected with the forthcoming inauguration of the power installation in October. But one important fallout of the visit to Senator Amosun, which was also reported by the Press was the disclosure of Ogun State government’s intention to collaborate with Lafarge Africa on the recycling and management of waste in the state.

When the power plant fully comes on steam, it has the capacity to generate far in excess of megawatts needed by the company while the rest can be wheeled to the national grid. I suspect the company’s gesture of constructing the big plant is structured as part of its corporate responsibility to help stem the tide of electricity shortage in Nigeria.

When the power plant fully comes on steam, it has the capacity to generate far in excess of megawatts needed by the company while the rest can be wheeled to the national grid.

I suspect the company’s gesture of constructing the big plant is structured as part of its corporate responsibility to help stem the tide of electricity shortage in Nigeria. The plant can also be of advantage to Ogun State’s industrial sector.

Today, Ogun State is regarded as the most industrialised in the country, courtesies of the industrial hubs in Agbara, Sango Ota, Sagamu and Lagos-Ibadan Expressway.

The Amosun-led administration has further created a conducive environment for industry to thrive in the state, as witnessed by the avalanche of 75 companies that have berthed in Ogun State since the past four years.

All these initiatives will contribute to the transformation of Ogun economy.



  • Niyi Adeyemo-Elegbede

    I hear you sir.

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